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April 2017

Susan Barton

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What Is Dyslexia?

10 Things All Teachers Should Know

15 Things NOT To Say To A Parent

A Mom's View

Accepting My Dyslexia

New Video

 
Audio Books Are Not Cheating


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What Is Dyslexia?

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Margie Gillis shares great information on what dyslexia is, and isn't, in this 4 minute video.

10 Things All Teachers Should Know

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10 things About Dyslexia All Teachers Should Know
by Nickola Wolf Nelson, Ph.D.

published on WeAreTeachers.com

Excerpt:

1. Dyslexia is a language processing problem.

It is not a vision problem. It's not about intelligence. It certainly isn't about laziness.

It affects the way the brain processes written and spoken language.

People with dyslexia have trouble mapping letters onto sounds and vice versa. Students with dyslexia usually have a hard time reading, but they can also struggle with spelling, writing and even pronouncing words.

 

2.  Dyslexia is hereditary and lifelong.

Dyslexia is not a phase or something you outgrow.

3.  Dyslexia is more common than many people think.

The International Dyslexia Association estimates that as many as 15 to 20 percent of people have some symptoms of dyslexia, such as trouble with reading, spelling and writing, or mixing up similar words.

Click here to see the entire article.

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15 Things NOT To Say To A Parent

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Thank you, Decoding Dyslexia Utah, for this graphic.

A Mom's View

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A Mom's View: This is what dyslexia looks like .....
By Julya Johnson
Published on Go.LearningAlly.org

We live dyslexia awareness every day, so I thought I would give you a small look through the glass into our life. Though it's not the same for every person, in my home:

Excerpt:

Awareness. Making sure everyone else knows weaknesses don't define us either or limit us. We can find ways to flow around rocks, and that only makes us stronger.

Surviving in a written world. Struggling to read a restaurant menu (after a previous reading breakthrough) because it's written in some weird fancy font. Stupid fancy fonts.

Click here to see more about daily ups and downs of having a child with dyslexia in your household.

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Accepting My Dyslexia

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Accepting My Dyslexia
By Kate Schaefer

Susan Barton loves getting emails from successful Barton students who want to give hope and encouragement to others who are just starting this journey. Here's one from Kate.

My name is Kate Schaefer, and I am dyslexic. I have been through the Barton System and let me tell you, it has done wonders.

I wrote this about the wonders of fighting, and eventually accepting, dyslexia. If I had read this when I was first diagnosed, it would have helped me so much emotionally along the way. Feel free to share it with anyone.

Why did this happen? How come me and not my siblings? I don't know. But I do know one thing. Although at times mind shatteringly challenging, it is one of the best things that has ever happened to me.

As I consider my personality, the obstacles I have had to overcome, and the immense amount of effort I have had to put forward, I know that something that has instilled this much strength, creativity, and determination in me could never be a bad thing.

Dyslexia has made me into the strong independent trooper I am today, and I hope that the other 15% of Americans see it this way as well.

My countless hours of tutoring, my recurring feeling of loss, and my constant need to put my best foot forward in order to succeed finally paid off. I went from a fourth grader unable to read the word "supply" to the winner of the Modern Woodmen Oration Contest.

I didn't just start to succeed in academic classes, but in the Fine Arts as well. My dyslexia drove a passion for crafts, sewing, music, and decorating like it has in many other dyslexics.

I am changed completely because of this, and I have made a decision to allow myself to fall in love with that fact.

I could be singing the same old "Why me?" song 5 years later.

But instead I am saying, "Why am I so lucky that I am a stronger, more creative woman than I would have been?"

To listen to this, or to share it, click here.

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New Video

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Susan Barton holds Facebook Live Video Chats to share important information. Each is 6 to 7 minutes, and the response has been terrific. Since they were recorded, you can watch them now  even if you do not use Facebook.

Chat #13: Tutoring During The Summer

Other popular chats include:

Chat #12: Retention and Opting Out

Chat #6: How to Measure Progress

Chat #10Penmanship and Typing

To view all of Susan Barton's video chats, click here.

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Audio Books Are Not Cheating

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Audio books are not cheating
by Melissa Dahl
published in New York Magazine

Excerpt:

I am in a book club. At the first meeting of this group, one woman mentioned that she had listened to that month's selection instead of reading it. That, the rest of the group decided together, is definitely cheating. Never mind that no one could exactly articulate how or why it was cheating; it just felt like it was.

This question whether or not listening to an audiobook is "cheating" is one University of Virginia psychologist Daniel Willingham gets fairly often, especially ever since he published a book, in 2015, on the science of reading.

He is very tired of this question. So recently, he wrote a blog post addressing it. He said:

If you take the question from the perspective of cognitive psychology that is, the mental processes involved there is no real difference between listening to a book and reading it.

So no, audiobooks are not cheating.

Click here to see the entire article.

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